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Live Reviews

Black Honey – Concorde 2, Brighton
Black Honey

Concorde 2, Brighton
Baloji – The Haunt, Brighton
Baloji

The Haunt, Brighton
Fatherson – Patterns, Brighton
Fatherson

Patterns, Brighton
Glasvegas – The Old Market, Hove
Glasvegas

The Old Market, Hove


Most Popular Articles

Album Reviews

Jess Glynne - Always In Between

Jess Glynne – Always In Between

It’s hard to believe that it was just a few years ago that Jess Glynne burst into the charts alongside deep house producer Route 94 with hit track ‘My Love’ along with a feature on Clean Bandit’s ‘Rather Be’. Since then she’s worked with the likes of Rudimental, as well as releasing her debut I Cry When I Laugh, which spawned hits such as ‘Hold My Hand’, ‘Don’t Be So Hard On Yourself’ and ‘Real Love’.

Now Glynne is back with her sophomore album, Always In Between, which features the singles ‘I’ll Be There’ and ‘All I Am’.

The KVB - Only Now Forever

The KVB – Only Now Forever

Returning for the first time since 2016, Only Now Forever feels like a new chapter for The KVB. The pair chose to produce the album themselves this time around, with that decision coinciding with a newly found liberal attitude towards instrumentation.

Kurt Vile - Bottle It In

Kurt Vile – Bottle It In

The Philadelphia rocker dropped the most successful album of his career with his last solo LP, 2015’s B’lieve I’m Goin Down. Then, last year, he released an acclaimed collaboration album with Australian singer-songwriter Courtney Barnett, Lotta Sea Lice. Now 38 and set to release his seventh solo album, Kurt Vile is continuing on his upward trajectory, whilst documenting his fears, hopes, and dreams on this, his most personal album to date.

HALEY - Pleasureland

HALEY – Pleasureland

To the casual follower of Haley Bonar (real name Haley McCallum), a fully instrumental album like Pleasureland will seem like it has come out of left field. However, in truth, the clues were there as far back as 2011’s debut Golder with its moody instrumental pieces hidden away inside. This album, released as the punchier Haley, takes that inclination to its logical conclusion, offering a fascinating and atmospheric view on the world.

Cat Power - Wanderer

Cat Power – Wanderer

The story goes that Matador played this experienced and relatively successful singer/songwriter an Adele album, the point being made to demonstrate what a hit album sounds like. Despite a working relationship with the esteemed American label stretching back 20 years, they didn't think Wanderer was worth their time or effort.

Estrons - You Say I’m Too Much, I Say You’re Not Enough

Estrons – You Say I’m Too Much, I Say You’re Not Enough

Cardiff’s Estrons, which means alien in Welsh, have been running rough shows on live venues for the past few years now. On record, however, they’ve been showing far more nuance and intelligence than many give them credit for. Their debut record, which highlights gender imbalance, single motherhood, and society’s addiction to love, is not only a vital, crucial and highly nuanced piece of work, it’s also one of the finest debut records of the year. Loud, angry, and passionate, Estrons have struck a winning formula. Importantly, too, each and every song has a purpose, sounds different, and provides sensual thrills. Clocking in at just over 30 minutes, You Say I’m Too Much, I Say You’re Not Enough is calculated, determined and intense.

Tokyo Police Club - TPC

Tokyo Police Club – TPC

Three quarters of Tokyo Police Club thought they were dead and buried until a couple of years ago. Greg Alsop was living and working in LA, whilst Graham Wright and Josh Hook had remained in Canada.

After some initial communications via email as they tried to make the band work, it felt as though it had run to its natural conclusion. However, when they asked singer-bassist and chief songwriter Dave Monks, who had settled into life in New York City and made a solo record, he disagreed and went on a mission to convince the Ontario group to make another LP.

John Smith - Hummingbird

John Smith – Hummingbird

Increasingly a household name in the folk world, John Smith has swiftly followed up on last year’s exceptional Headlong with another superb collection of gems. This time, he has cast his net wide for inspiration and delved deep into the rich history of the genre - Hummingbird is made up largely (with some notable exceptions) of updated versions of folk standards. It also confirms Smith as a worthy descendant from the line of Renbourn, Thompson, Jansch, Drake et al.

Spring King - A Better Life

Spring King – A Better Life

After calling their debut record Tell Me if You Like To “Chaotic, riddled with singalong choruses and, more than anything, energy.” and featuring their brilliant single ‘Who Are You?’ on Brightonsfinest , Vol. 2, it’s safe to say that we’re big fans of the Mancunian band here at Brightonsfinest. However, after a quiet 2017 we were a tad worried that the quartet might fade into obscurity like many of their contemporaries. Thankfully, they’re back with A Better Life and, if anything, it’s a huge statement of intent from the band and an improvement on the original.


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